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Ad Published in Sunday, July 8, 2018 Edition of Vallejo Times-Herald:



​​​​​​​Ad Published in Sunday, July 8, 2018 and Sunday, July 22, 2018 Editions of Vallejo Times-Herald:



Ad Published in Wednesday, July 4, 2018 Edition of Vallejo Times-Herald:


 
 

Ad Published in Wednesday, July 4, 2018, Sunday, July 15, 2018 and Sunday, July 22, 2018 Editions of Vallejo Times-Herald:



 

Ad Published in Sunday, July 1, 2018 Edition of Vallejo Times-Herald:

 
 

Ad Published in Sunday, July 1, 2018 Edition of Vallejo Times-Herald (see source documentation that follows this ad):

(1) Vallejo Marine Terminal and Orcem Revised Project Description (released October 17, 2017), 2.4 (p6 of 52)
Proposed Project
"In addition, the VMT Terminal would not handle municipal waste, coal, petroleum coke or any other petroleum-based product such as gasoline or crude oil."

Ad Published in Thursday, June 28, 2018 Edition of Vallejo Times-Herald:

 

Ad Published in Thursday, June 28, 2018 and Sunday, July 15, 2018 Editions of Vallejo Times-Herald (see source documentation that follows this ad):


(1) Vallejo Marine Terminal and Orcem Project Draft Final EIRFEIR, 3.3-63 (p282 of 748)

Stormwater Runoff to Bay–Delta Waters

“…the planned stormwater control plans for both the VMT and Orcem Sites have all stormwater directed away from the Napa River and contained in a retention pond. As a result, no potential threat to special-status species is anticipated from stormwater runoff from the collective projects and is determined to be less than significant.”

Vallejo Marine Terminal and Orcem Project Draft Final EIRFEIR, 3.3-63 (p282 of 748)

“…The proposed drainage plan and required NPDES compliance would adequately address the potential for stormwater runoff to adversely affect water quality. As currently proposed, the bio-retention basin is design for a runoff of 13 cubic feet per second, which exceeds the 8.2 cfs that would be produced in a 10-year storm within the drainage areas associated with the VMT.”

 

(2) Vallejo Marine Terminal and Orcem Project Draft Final EIRFEIR, 3.3-63 (p282 of 748)

B) Would the project have a substantial adverse effect on any riparian habitat or other sensitive natural community identified in local or regional plans, policies, regulations or by the California Department of Fish and Wildlife or U.S. Fish and Wildlife Service?

 

Terrestrial Biological Resources

VMT and Orcem Project Analysis

Approximately 0.01 acre of Northern Coastal Salt Marsh and 0.02 acre of Seasonal Wetland occur on the project site; however, these areas would not be impacted by the proposed project. Therefore, no impact to terrestrial riparian habitat or other sensitive natural community would occur as a result of the proposed project.

 

Marine Biological Resources

VMT and Orcem Project Analysis

No known eelgrass or extensive submerged aquatic vegetation beds occur at the VMT or Orcem Sites. Potential removal of some existing subtidal rock shoreline armoring/riprap and pier pilings may remove some artificial habitat used to support submerged aquatic vegetation, but their replacement by new pilings and hard substrate subtidal armoring/riprap, which would be recolonized, would result in a less than significant impact.

 

 

(3) Vallejo Marine Terminal and Orcem Project Draft Final EIR, 3.3-38 (p256 of 748)

“Wharf Redevelopment

…Removal of approximately 444 decaying creosote and concrete-jacketed creosote wood pilings”

 

(4) San Francisco Estuary Institute 2010 Report available online Removal of Creosote-Treated Pilings and Structures from San Francisco Bay

“…Laboratory and field investigation found a major detrimental impact on hatching and development of fish (herring) eggs attached to aquatic pilings, even pilings that were 40 years old, suggesting that some sensitive species may be adversely affected by creosote-treated pilings.”

 

(5) Ioannou, Filipa, “Pilings in bay imperil Pacific herring, ‘linchpin’ in food chain”, San Francisco Chronicle, 24 November 2016.

“The fish in question, the Pacific herring, is a critical species to local ecosystems — scientists describe it as a “linchpin” and a “keystone” because it feeds so many other animals. But the population is threatened by the bay’s decaying wood pilings, which are treated with creosote, a distillation of coal tar used as a wood preservative and pesticide.

 

That’s why the National Fish and Wildlife Foundation is spending millions of dollars to remove the pilings at a site near the old Red Rock Warehouse on Richmond’s public land, with the California Coastal Conservancy leading the effort.”

 

(6) Vallejo Marine Terminal and Orcem Project Draft Final EIR, 3.3-44 (p262 of 748)

“…The temporary loss of 600 linear feet of lower and middle intertidal and subtidal artificial hard substrate and associated biota as a result of the deconstruction of the existing wharf and construction of the new wharf and dike at the VMT Site, when combined with the addition of approximately 800 680 linear feet (0.92 0.78 acre) of middle and lower intertidal and subtidal artificial hard substrate and the creation of additional intertidal and subtidal hard substrate habitat, would potentially support a more diverse and abundant biological community, including providing more habitat for native Olympia oysters and other species, which could be expected to provide improved fish foraging….”
 

Ad Published in Sunday, June 24, 2018 and Thursday, July 12, 2018 Editions of Vallejo Times-Herald:



 

Ad Published in Sunday, June 24, 2018 and Thursday, July 12, 2018 Editions of Vallejo Times-Herald (see source documentation on the 3 images that follow this ad):