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(1) Correspondence to the City of Vallejo from California Northern Railroad Company, July 2017

Confirmation on the prohibition of worn steel wheels on railroad tracks in the City of Vallejo

"1. Noise Vibration Analysis: A 10db penalty should not be added to the Caltrans formula, because the FRA mandates that CFNR not operate with rail equipment that has flat or worn wheels. There is a 2 inch wear limit. In order to insure CFNR compliance with Federal Law, all rail car wheels are inspected at Suisun interchange (with Union Pacific), and if not compliant, replaced."

(2) Draft Final Environmental Impact Report: Chapter 3.12.4 -- Traffic and Transportation: Impact Discussion, February 2017

Mitigation of rail crossing delays by reducing car lengths from 100 to 50 cars

"If maximum train lengths were reduced from 100 cars to 50 cars, this would have a substantial beneficial effect on traffic at the grade crossings, reducing driver delay and traffic queue interference with upstream intersections, relative to the 100-car maximum trains."

(3) Draft Final Environmental Impact Report: Chapter 3.12.4 -- Traffic and Transportation: Mitigation Measures, February 2017

Impact 3.12-5: Emergency Access at At-Grade Rail Crossings and Mitigation Measure 3.12-2B
"Prior to the issuance of permits for rail operations, the project applicants shall notify the police and fire departments of proposed rail operations and potential delays to facilitate alternative routing during emergencies."
 



(1) Draft Final Environmental Impact Report: Chapter 3.12.4 -- Traffic and Transportation: Mitigation Measures, February 2017

Impact 3.12-5: Emergency Access at At-Grade Rail Crossings and Mitigation Measure 3.12-2A
"
The applicants shall work with the California Northern Railroad to limit train movements through Vallejo to between 9:00 a.m. and 4:00 p.m., thus minimizing the traffic queueing associated with the train movements across the grade crossings throughout the city during peak commute hours."

(2) Verbal counterarguments to applicant presentation stated by Andrea Ouse at May 2017 Vallejo City Council meeting
Contradictory statements on presence of "worn steel wheels" on railcars and resulting significant vibrantional noise impacts (clarification below based on correspondence from California Northern Railroad Company to the City of Vallejo):

"...the FRA mandates that CFNR not operate with rail equipment that has flat or worn wheels. There is a 2 inch wear limit. In order to insure CFNR compliance with Federal Law, all rail car wheels are inspected at Suisun interchange (with Union Pacific), and if not compliant, replaced."

(3) Correspondence to the City of Vallejo from California Northern Railroad Company, July 2017

Confirmation on the prohibition of worn steel wheels on railroad tracks in the City of Vallejo

"1. Noise Vibration Analysis: A 10db penalty should not be added to the Caltrans formula, because the FRA mandates that CFNR not operate with rail equipment that has flat or worn wheels. There is a 2 inch wear limit. In order to insure CFNR compliance with Federal Law, all rail car wheels are inspected at Suisun interchange (with Union Pacific), and if not compliant, replaced."









(1)(2) and (3) Update to Fiscal and Economic Impact Study prepared by Economist Chris Seals, February 25, 2018

Job Creation Figures Explained

“The job creation from the two projects is expected to be significant. Together, the two projects are expected to support a total of 192 permanent jobs by 2025. By 2025 when both projects are in operation, they are expected to directly employ workers in 99 full-time equivalent jobs. In addition, it is expected that the project will generate 51 indirect jobs in Solano County from companies that supply services related to the projects. The induced effects of the operations are expected to support the creation of 42 induced jobs (jobs created from re-spending wages). Additional temporary jobs will also be created in the earlier years of the project during the construction phases. At maturity in 2025, the projects will generate $13.18 million in wages paid to workers.”

 


(1) Vallejo Marine Terminal and Orcem Revised Project Description (released October 17, 2017), 2.4 (p6 of 52)
Proposed Project
"In addition, the VMT Terminal would not handle municipal waste, coal, petroleum coke or any other petroleum-based product such as gasoline or crude oil."





(1) Vallejo Marine Terminal and Orcem Project Draft Final EIRFEIR, 3.3-63 (p282 of 748)

Stormwater Runoff to Bay–Delta Waters

“…the planned stormwater control plans for both the VMT and Orcem Sites have all stormwater directed away from the Napa River and contained in a retention pond. As a result, no potential threat to special-status species is anticipated from stormwater runoff from the collective projects and is determined to be less than significant.”

Vallejo Marine Terminal and Orcem Project Draft Final EIRFEIR, 3.3-63 (p282 of 748)

“…The proposed drainage plan and required NPDES compliance would adequately address the potential for stormwater runoff to adversely affect water quality. As currently proposed, the bio-retention basin is design for a runoff of 13 cubic feet per second, which exceeds the 8.2 cfs that would be produced in a 10-year storm within the drainage areas associated with the VMT.”

 

(2) Vallejo Marine Terminal and Orcem Project Draft Final EIRFEIR, 3.3-63 (p282 of 748)

B) Would the project have a substantial adverse effect on any riparian habitat or other sensitive natural community identified in local or regional plans, policies, regulations or by the California Department of Fish and Wildlife or U.S. Fish and Wildlife Service?

 

Terrestrial Biological Resources

VMT and Orcem Project Analysis

Approximately 0.01 acre of Northern Coastal Salt Marsh and 0.02 acre of Seasonal Wetland occur on the project site; however, these areas would not be impacted by the proposed project. Therefore, no impact to terrestrial riparian habitat or other sensitive natural community would occur as a result of the proposed project.

 

Marine Biological Resources

VMT and Orcem Project Analysis

No known eelgrass or extensive submerged aquatic vegetation beds occur at the VMT or Orcem Sites. Potential removal of some existing subtidal rock shoreline armoring/riprap and pier pilings may remove some artificial habitat used to support submerged aquatic vegetation, but their replacement by new pilings and hard substrate subtidal armoring/riprap, which would be recolonized, would result in a less than significant impact.

 

 

(3) Vallejo Marine Terminal and Orcem Project Draft Final EIR, 3.3-38 (p256 of 748)

“Wharf Redevelopment

…Removal of approximately 444 decaying creosote and concrete-jacketed creosote wood pilings”

 

(4) San Francisco Estuary Institute 2010 Report available online Removal of Creosote-Treated Pilings and Structures from San Francisco Bay

“…Laboratory and field investigation found a major detrimental impact on hatching and development of fish (herring) eggs attached to aquatic pilings, even pilings that were 40 years old, suggesting that some sensitive species may be adversely affected by creosote-treated pilings.”

 

(5) Ioannou, Filipa, “Pilings in bay imperil Pacific herring, ‘linchpin’ in food chain”, San Francisco Chronicle, 24 November 2016.

“The fish in question, the Pacific herring, is a critical species to local ecosystems — scientists describe it as a “linchpin” and a “keystone” because it feeds so many other animals. But the population is threatened by the bay’s decaying wood pilings, which are treated with creosote, a distillation of coal tar used as a wood preservative and pesticide.

 

That’s why the National Fish and Wildlife Foundation is spending millions of dollars to remove the pilings at a site near the old Red Rock Warehouse on Richmond’s public land, with the California Coastal Conservancy leading the effort.”

 

(6) Vallejo Marine Terminal and Orcem Project Draft Final EIR, 3.3-44 (p262 of 748)

“…The temporary loss of 600 linear feet of lower and middle intertidal and subtidal artificial hard substrate and associated biota as a result of the deconstruction of the existing wharf and construction of the new wharf and dike at the VMT Site, when combined with the addition of approximately 800 680 linear feet (0.92 0.78 acre) of middle and lower intertidal and subtidal artificial hard substrate and the creation of additional intertidal and subtidal hard substrate habitat, would potentially support a more diverse and abundant biological community, including providing more habitat for native Olympia oysters and other species, which could be expected to provide improved fish foraging….”